Texas Withdrawal Letter

Officially Withdraw Your Child By Letter Or Email

If your child is already enrolled in a Texas public school and you would like to begin homeschooling then you must notify the school district that you will be withdrawing your child. The good news is that you can do this with an email or letter. You do not have to go in to the office or call the district to inform them of your decision.

Follow these steps to officially withdraw your child by LETTER.

  1. Copy and paste the sample Texas Withdrawal Letter below in a new document to print.
  2. Enter your personal information in the brackets and print 2 copies.
  3. Print the commissioner’s letter and include it in the envelope with your withdrawal letter.
  4. Mail a signed copy of your letter by Certified Mail Return Receipt Requested so you can get proof of delivery.
  5. Keep a copy of your withdrawal letter and your post office receipts for your records to show proof of your correspondence.
  6. Send the letter one day, keep your child home the next day, and then begin homeschooling.

Follow these steps to officially withdraw your child through EMAIL.

  1. Copy and paste the sample Texas Withdrawal Email below in a new email.
  2. Enter your personal information in the brackets.
  3. Send your email to the principle, counselor, and attendance clerk of the school your child is enrolled in. Also include anyone else from the school you have been in contact with.
  4. Send the email one day, keep your child home the next day, and then begin homeschooling.

NOTE: Because homeschool is considered a private school in Texas the state will count any days that you are not schooling as an absence and can charge you for truancy (staying away from school without permission). In order to avoid truancy charges make sure you withdraw your child from school before beginning to homeschool. Then begin to homeschool your child directly after withdrawing them from public school.

What If The School Wants More?

The school may contact you after receiving your letter and ask you to come into the office to fill out forms or for more detailed information. If this happens then simply respond by emailing or mailing this letter of assurance. You do not have to go in to the school or give them more information.

 

Sample Texas Withdrawal Letter

This sample letter is by the Texas Home School Coalition Association.

Copy and paste the following text into a separate document to print:

[Your Address]
[Your City, State, ZIP]
[Your email address]
[Your phone number]

[Date]

Principal [Full Name]
[School Name]
[Address]
[City, State, ZIP]

Dear Mr(s). [Principal’s Last Name]:

I am writing to notify you that I am withdrawing my child, [Child’s Name], from enrollment in the [School District Name] ISD, effective the date of this letter, and will begin teaching [him/her] at home at this time.

If you have further questions, please submit them to me in writing at the above [address/email

According to the Texas Commissioner of Education, it is not necessary for a parent to make an appearance at the school or to complete the school’s withdrawal forms. This letter is adequate notification for you to disenroll my child, [Child’s Name]. I have enclosed the most recent letter from the Texas Commissioner of Education for your instruction in removing my child from your school attendance roll. An online version is available to you at tea.texas.gov/About_TEA/News_and_Multimedia/Correspondence/TAA_Letters/Home_Schools/.

If you have further questions, please submit them to me in writing at the above address.

Sincerely,

[Your Name]

 

Sample Texas Withdrawal Email

This sample email is by the Texas Home School Coalition Association.

Copy and paste the following text into a new email to send:

[Your Address]
[Your City, State, ZIP]
[Your e-mail address]
[Your phone number]

[Date]

Principal [Full Name]
[School Name]
[Address]
[City, State, ZIP]

Dear Mr(s). [Principal’s Last Name]:

I am writing to notify you that I am withdrawing my child, [Child’s Name], from enrollment in the [School District Name] ISD, effective the date of this letter and will begin teaching [him/her] at home at this time.

According to the Texas Commissioner of Education, it is not necessary for a parent to make an appearance at the school or to complete the school’s withdrawal forms. This letter is adequate notification for you to disenroll my child, [Child’s Name]. The most recent letter from the Texas Commissioner of Education for your instruction in removing my child from your school attendance roll is available to you on the TEA website at tea.texas.gov/About_TEA/News_and_Multimedia/Correspondence/TAA_Letters/Home_Schools/.

Please reply to acknowledge your receipt of this email as well as to communicate any further questions.

Sincerely,

[Your Name]

 

 


2 thoughts on “Texas Withdrawal Letter”

  1. I spoke to a very rude Judge here in Texas about withdrawing my child from regular school. He’s been harassed and bullied at his school and has missed to much school due to that.
    So he has to go to truancy court and I told the judge that I was going to homeschool him on the program K-12 and he looked down on it and said that it has to be a Certified school. I told him that I had looked into it and that it was Certified and that I was going to withdraw him out of his regular school.
    He said that he HAD TO APPROVE THE SCHOOL CERTIFIABLE and it wasn’t up to me to say it was!
    So will this letter of Assurance help?? Or do I have to keep him in his school that does nothing to help and are not interested in child/teenager?

    1. Eliza,

      I don’t know if a truancy judge would have different authority than what it states in the homeschool law. My advice in your situation would be to contact Home School Legal Defense Association directly (HSLDA.org). They are lawyers who help homeschool families with situations like these through direct representation.
      Based on the Texas homeschool law you should be able to just send in this letter of Withdrawal and a letter of Assurance. The online K-12 program you mentioned sounds like it meets the requirement to have a written curriculum. So it sounds like other than getting legal help with this judge you are good to go with homeschooling.
      I hope this is helpful. Good luck!

      Liza

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