Montana Homeschool Law

Help keep HOMESCHOOL STATE LAWS up to date! If any of these post links aren’t giving you the intended information or if the information contained in this post is out of date, please let us know by leaving a comment below.

LOW REGULATIONS

Homeschool State Laws Montana Homeschool Law

 

 Required Attendance Age

The state of Montana requires your child to attend school from the age of 7 to 16 years old. Legal schooling options include:

  • public school
  • nonpublic school (parochial, church, private, or religious)
  • supervised home study
  • correspondence study
  • homeschool 

(see legal reference #1 )

 

Notify The School District

The Montana Homeschool Law requires you to notify your county superintendent of schools each year that you chose to homeschool. Your county Superintendent of Schools will provide you with a notification form to fill out and send in. They may also provide you with an attendance sheet.

The following link provides a list of all Montana county superintendents of schools and a link to any information they have available online: Montana County Superintendents of Schools

(see legal reference #2: 5)

If You Need To Withdraw Your Child

If your child is already attending a Montana public school then you will need to officially withdraw them in order to begin homeschooling. Contact your child’s school and ask if they have a preferred method of withdrawal. They may provide you with a form or just ask for some specific information via email or letter.

 

Qualify

The Montana Homeschool Law does not require you to meet any specific qualifications in order to homeschool.

To homeschool a child you must simply be their parent, step-parent or legal guardian. You must also live in a home that meets local health and safety regulations.

(see legal reference #2: 3)

 

Hours of Instruction

The Montana Homeschool Law requires you to teach the following minimum hours/year:

  • 360 hours for kindergarten
  • 720 hours for grades 1-3
  • 1,080 hours for grades 4-12

(see legal reference #2: 2 & 3)

 

Required Subjects

The Montana Homeschool Law requires you to teach the basic educational subjects that are taught in Montana public schools.

(see legal reference #2: 4)

 

Keep Records

The Montana Homeschool Law requires you to keep records of your child(s) homeschool attendance and immunizations.

NOTE: Your county superintendent of schools can ask to see your attendance and immunization records if they feel there is a need.

(see legal reference #2:1)

HSLDA also suggests that you keep detailed records of your homeschool program and samples of your child’s work in case you might ever need proof of your child’s education.

 

Testing

The Montana Homeschool Law does not require homeschool students to participate in yearly testing.

 

Immunization Law For Montana Homeschoolers

The state of Montana requires all students to receive vaccinations, including homeschool students. You must keep records of your child’s immunizations. Your superintendent of schools can ask to see these records if feel it is necessary.

(see legal references #2:1 & 4)

 

Helpful Websites For Montana Homeschoolers

For local support and information visit this Montana homeschool website:

Montana Coalition of Home Educators

 

Legal References

  1. Required Attendance Age: Montana Code Annotated 20-5-102.
  2. Nonpublic School Requirements: Montana Code Annotated 20-5-109.
  3. School Year: Montana Code Annotated 20-1-301.
  4. Immunizations: Montana Code Annotated 20-5-406 & 20-5-403.

 

This summary is for informational purposes only and is not given as legal advice. HomeschoolStateLaws.com does not endorse any of the links or organizations listed above.


One thought on “Montana Homeschool Law”

  1. I was contacted by an agency that does background checks for employment and was asked who they should contact in order to get homeschool records for a former Montana homeschool student. The answer of course is the parent, not the school district. Even through Montana doesn’t require you to keep any specific records of your homeschooling, or participate in yearly testing, it is a good idea to follow HSLDA’s suggestion and keep, at the very least, a portfolio of your child’s work so that you have proof of your child’s education in case an employer asks for it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.